Agricultural Uses for Propane

Crop Production

An operation that uses land exclusively for growing crops like barley, sorghum, wheat, corn, rice, rye, canola, and soybeans.

 

Commonly Used Propane-Powered Equipment:

  • Irrigation engines

  • Grain dryers

  • Generators

  • Pickup trucks

  • Forklifts

  • Building and water heating

  • Flame weed control

  • Commercial-grade mowers

Hay and Forage Production

An operation that uses land exclusively for the production of grass, legumes, or other herbaceous plants that will be harvested and sold to livestock owners for animal feed.

 

Commonly Used Propane-Powered Equipment:

  • Irrigation engines

  • Pickup trucks

  • Forklifts

  • Building and water heating

  • Commercial-grade mowers

Livestock Farming

An operation that uses land to raise and care for livestock.

 

Commonly Used Propane-Powered Equipment:

  • Irrigation engines

  • Generators

  • Pickup trucks

  • Forklifts

  • Building and water heating

  • Commercial-grade mowers

Dairy Farming

An operation that uses land to raise and care for dairy cows.

 

Commonly Used Propane-Powered Equipment:

  • Irrigation engines

  • Generators

  • Pickup trucks

  • Forklifts

  • Building and water heating

  • Commercial-grade mowers

Mixed Farming

An operation that involves two or more types of farming like livestock and crop farming, in which a tract of land would be specified for grazing purposes, while another would be used to grow crops or hay.

 

Commonly Used Propane-Powered Equipment:

  • Irrigation engines

  • Grain dryers

  • Pickup trucks

  • Forklifts

  • Building and water heating

  • Commercial-grade mowers

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Frequently Asked Questions

Why should a farmer care that propane-powered farm equipment produces fewer emissions?

Today, more than ever, sustainability and environmentally friendly practices influence decisions that affect an operation. Propane is a clean-burning fuel that meets Tier 4 regulations outlined in the Clean Air Act without compromising the performance farmers need.

 

What types of farm equipment can run on propane?

Propane can satisfy most major energy uses: irrigation

engines, grain dryers, standby generators, building and

water heating, flame weed control, vehicles, mowers, and

forklifts.

 

How does the cost of equipment powered by propane

compare with equipment powered by other fuels?

Propane-powered equipment is competitively priced with

other equipment for products like grain dryers and heaters

for animals, greenhouses, or water. Propane irrigation

engines typically cost less than comparable diesel engines.

 

What incentives are available?

Sponsored by PERC, the Propane Farm Incentive Program is a research program that provides a financial incentive toward the purchase of new propane-powered farm equipment like irrigation engines and grain dryers. In exchange, participants agree to share real-world performance data with PERC. Other programs offered through national, state, and local organizations help farmers experience the benefits of propane technology while helping off set the initial costs of propane equipment. Please visit our Rebates & Incentives page for additional information.

 

Are propane-powered engines as durable as diesel engines?

The biggest factors that contribute to long engine life are properly sizing, loading, and maintaining the engine. Regular maintenance intervals and cost per interval differ between propane and diesel, but overall costs are projected to be equal or slightly in favor of propane-powered engines. And with propane units costing less to purchase than comparable horsepower diesel engines, the advantages are clear. A propane engine is certified for a 5,000-hour emission life. Some have reported engine life as high as 15,000 to 20,000 hours for properly sized, operated, and maintained propane-powered engines.

 

What horsepower or sizes of propane-powered irrigation

engines are available?

Most new propane-powered engines today are based on gaseous

fuel prepped gasoline engine blocks. Several models are available

from industrial engine suppliers, ranging from 4 cylinder models

up to 8 and 10 cylinder models. PERC has partnered to develop

several new models in large sizes such as 6.8, 8.0, 8.8, 9.1, and

10.3-liters of displacement, while there are propane-powered

engines available up to a 22-liter engine and roughly 300

horsepower. There is a broad spectrum of engine sizes available

to meet an operation’s needs.

 

How much propane does a propane-powered engine consume?

Less than you’d think. New propane-powered engines are more

efficient than those produced decades ago. PERC has conducted

multiple studies comparing propane engines side by side with

diesel counterparts to monitor fuel consumption for conducting

similar work. The research found that propane outperformed

diesel on a per-dollar basis.

 

What are the advantages of using propane?

First and foremost, propane is a cost-effective solution for farming operations. This is especially true in the summer, when propane typically reaches its lowest price per gallon and diesel is at its highest. Propane is also more environmentally friendly than other fuels. Engines powered by propane emit fewer greenhouse gases than gasoline or diesel engines. As an American-made fuel, propane supplies are readily available, making it a reliable fuel for farming operations. And with regular maintenance and proper use, propane-powered equipment can last for decades. The storability of propane adds to its reliability. Properly stored propane will last indefinitely and not deteriorate over time or cause potential waste and pollution like other fuels.

 

Are propane storage tanks safe?

A propane tank is 20 times as puncture resistant as a typical gasoline, methanol, or ethanol tank. And when properly maintained, they can last up to 40 years or more.